Archive for the ‘Boston Lodging’ Category

Vacationing in Boston? Money saving tips!

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Traveling can cost a bundle: when you figure in airfare, lodging, food and attractions, the costs can seem overwhelming. And Boston is an expensive city. Fear not! Here are some great tips for saving money when staying in Boston…

1.  Forgo expensive hotels and rent a furnished apartment. This especially makes sense when traveling as a family or with friends. One of the many perks of renting an apartment is that you’ll experience the city as a resident instead of a tourist, in a residential neighborhood, among the locals. While most hotels in the city will cost you well over $300/night per room, you’ll be able to find comfortable apartments in most areas of the city (North End, Back Bay, South End, Beacon Hill, etc) for half the cost.

2. Eat like a Bostonian. Some of the best food in the city can be found at food trucks and ethnic hold-in-the-walls that don’t cost a fortune. Chinatown is chock full of delicious little restaurants that offer dim sum (yummy appetizer-like dishes typically eaten for lunch) and authentic Asian cuisine. The North End has many restaurants that offer traditional and modern Italian food for cheap (as well as fine dining). You’ll find food trucks all around the city, such as Copley Square. And if you’re staying at an apartment instead of a hotel, simply load up the fridge and eat breakfast at home for pennies while you save your money for lunch and dinner.

3. Travel off season.  There are some key dates to avoid, as accommodation rates soar during those times. Save money and don’t travel during:  April 18 – 21 (the Marathon), mid May through early June (college graduation season) and October 16 – 19 (Head of the Charles Regatta in Cambridge). And if you are an adventurer with an open mind, consider visiting Boston in December, January, February or March, when rates will be rock bottom.

4. Forgo major league sports. An afternoon watching the Sox at Fenway can cost you upwards of $200 per person if you figure in parking, food and ticket. However, you can attend a wonderful college or minor league game for a fraction of that cost. Go ahead and experience Fenway through an off hours tour, then escape the insanity before the game begins.

5. Forgo a rental car. Boston is a small city, and you can experience most of it by subway and foot. That stereotype of the aggressive and inept Boston driver? It’s spot-on. And Boston streets, most of which were built on former cow paths, are confusing, to say the least. One way streets are common, as are rotaries and missing street signs. When you’re done driving, you’ll have to find a parking spot, which will be next to impossible to find. Want to park in a lot or garage? Be prepared to spend about $30/day. Trust us, you don’t want to deal with a car in the city!

6. Take advantage of discounts for museums and attractions.  There are wonderful museums in Boston, but they can cost a small fortune. However, many museums offer big discounts during specific times. For example, The Boston Children’s Museum costs just $1 per person on Friday evenings from 5-9 pm. The Institute of Contemporary Art is free on Thursdays from 5-9 pm and the last Saturday of each month. The Boston City Pass and Go Boston Card (smartdestinations.com) are full of free admissions and discounts. So with a bit of savvy and advance planning, you can save a bundle.

7. Stay in lesser known areas in and near Boston. We all know and love the Back Bay, Beacon Hill and North End. Which is why accommodations in those areas can cost you a pretty penny. The South End is right next to the Back Bay and because it’s not as well known, bargains can be had. Brookline and Cambridge are charming urban towns just outside Boston; they are subway accessible (just minutes away) and boast wonderful shops, restaurants and attractions.

 

 

Discover Porter Square!

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Cambridge is a city of squares — Harvard, Kendall, Central and Inman, to name a few — each with it’s own distinct vibe and interesting mix of shops and restaurants.  While you may gravitate to the historic charm of Harvard Square or the bustling energy of Central Square, you could overlook the convenience and affordability of Porter Square.  Porter Square is a great option for visitors looking for accommodations, regardless of where they need to be in Cambridge or Boston.   Walking distance to Davis Square and one T-stop away from Harvard Square, Porter Square is located on the Red Line and is a short subway ride into downtown Boston.  The area is home to some of the best restaurants in Cambridge — The Elephant Walk, Temple Bar and Chez Henri are perennial favorites — and an eclectic mix of locally owned stores like Porter Square Books.

 

We are always enthusiastic when we recommend a vacation rental or B&B in the Porter Square area and hope you’ll explore this little gem the next time you visit Cambridge.  If you’re looking for Porter Square accommodations, here are two we recommend:

Cambridge Accommodation Near Harvard

Gray House Cambridge Accommodations

 

 

Make the Most of Your College Tour in Boston

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

 

If you’re looking at colleges in the Boston area, you’re in good company.  Home to more than 50 colleges and 249,000 students, Boston is truly America’s College Town.  However, visiting area schools can be daunting and requires some advance planning.

 

  1. Consider what type of college interests you.  A big university or small college?  A self-contained campus or urban environment?  A world-renowned science program or top-notch music school?  Boston offers all of the above!  Before you visit, check out a few colleges in your area to get a feel for what type of environment you like.  You’ll be able to narrow your focus when you visit Boston and won’t waste time visiting schools that aren’t a good fit.
  2. Plan around peak tourist events.  This may be a big city, but there are certain times of the year when finding Boston area accommodations can be challenging and cost-prohibitive.  Avoid visiting during the Boston Marathon (mid-April), college graduations (mid-May), fall foliage season and the Head of the Charles regatta (mid-October).
  3. Leave the car at home.  One of the best things about visiting and living in the Boston area is its great public transportation system.  On the flipside, traffic and navigating through the city can be a nightmare for out-of-towners.  Try to plan your visit without driving everywhere and book accommodations in a central location.  Stay in a vacation rental apartment in Back Bay or Cambridge and take the “T” to the campuses you’re visiting.
  4. Plan for changing weather.  As the saying goes, if you don’t like the weather in New England, wait a minute.  This is especially true in the spring and fall.  It can be 50 degrees one day in April and 80 degrees the next, so plan accordingly.
  5. Talk to as many people as you can.  Seek out students on campus for directions and ask lots of questions.  Every student you talk to will have a different experience and different perspective to share.  Try staying at a bed and breakfast or small inn near one of the campuses you’re visiting.  Your hosts can offer a wealth of insider information and give you a sense of what it’s like to live in this great city!

Choose a Vacation Rental for Your Next Business Trip

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

As a business traveler, you’re probably accustomed to staying in large, chain hotels with standardized rooms and amenities.  Whether you’re in Boston or Barcelona, it all feels the same.  But have you ever thought about trying something different?   Here are our top five reasons for choosing a vacation rental for your next business trip.

  1. Live like a local.  Have you ever glanced out a cab window as you’re passing through a charming neighborhood and wondered what it would be like to live there?  Why not rent an apartment in that neighborhood and find out!  Odds are, you’ll enjoy being away from the hustle and bustle of the conference hotel or convention center and you’ll feel like you really got to know the city.
  2. Bring your family.  It’s frustrating when you travel to a great destination but have to leave your family behind.  Staying in a vacation rental offers an affordable way to extend your business trip into a family vacation.  Avoid the costs of multiple hotel rooms and enjoy amenities such as a kitchen, free wifi and enough space to spread out.
  3. Pack light.  Many vacation rentals have a washer/dryer unit in the apartment or offer access to a laundry room in the building.  Avoid extra fees and the inconvenience of checked luggage and pack only what you need for a few days.
  4. Enjoy your own private meeting space.  Rather than meeting with your colleagues in a noisy hotel lobby, take advantage of the private, quiet living room in your vacation rental.  Stock the kitchen with snacks and get your work done without the interruptions and distractions of meeting in a public place.
  5. Book through a reputable agency and get exactly what you want.  Most cities have agencies that represent a broad range of vacation rentals and can offer guidance on location, budget and amenities.  You’ll end up with accommodations that meet your needs and memories of a great stay!

Harvard Graduation Cambridge Lodging, Boston Accommodations

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Are you looking for Cambridge lodging or Boston accommodations for the upcoming Harvard University graduation ceremony? We still have Cambridge vacation rentals and Boston furnished apartments available for visit with no additional fees. Check out our listing at http://www.bnbboston.com/specials.

Congratulations to all of our new Harvard graduates and their proud families!

Looking to Stay in Boston?

Thursday, February 14th, 2008

If you are bored with cookie-cutter hotel ambiance or overwhelmed by hotel room prices, Bed and Breakfast Associates Bay Colony could be of great help to you. Our personal touch gives you alternatives to hotel lodging and fits you with places that match your requirements. Since 1981, our staff has helped thousands of people in their search for Eastern MA and Boston lodging. We offer bed and breakfasts, inns, furnished apartments for nightly and monthly stays, small hotels, and home stays that provide the amenities and location you need at prices that match your budget. Visit us at www.bnbboston.com
We will save you:
– Time (when weeding through a plethora of properties)
– Money (rates at our properties are typically much lower than at hotels)
– Stress (You won’t have to commit to lengthy leases at furnished apartments and we really do take care of everything!)
– Legwork (we specialize in matching guests with properties, so one phone call is all you will make!)
– Aggravation (again, we take care of everything!)
Visit us at www.bnbboston.com or call 888-468-6018. It’s really that simple!

What is a Bed and Breakfast or Homestay?

Tuesday, June 20th, 2006

What is a Bed and Breakfast?
A bed and breakfast is a sleeping accommodation for the traveling and vacationing public located within a single dwelling which is the residence of the owner, who, most often, is the operator (or innkeeper), and may include a full or continental breakfast. Bed and breakfasts, typically offer 4-12 rooms.

A bed and breakfast homestay is a sleeping accommodation for the traveling and vacationing public located within a single dwelling which is the residence of the owner, who is also the operator (or innkeeper), and may include a full or continental breakfast. Bed and breakfasts, typically offer 1-3 rooms. Simply put, it is a home where extra bedrooms are rented out to guests.

An Inn is a larger bed and breakfast.

What is a bed and breakfast experience like?
Staying at a bed and breakfast, it is a wonderfully unique experience. Upon arrival, the guest is usually greeted by the host or hostess who will show the guest around the property. (If the host or hostess is unable to greet the guest, a note with directions and a key will be set aside for the guest.) Typically, a fully breakfast is served, but in small homestays continental breakfast foods are provided for the guests in the dining area of the home, or on a tray in the guest room. By law in Massachusetts, the home owners/bed and breakfast hosts are not able to serve a hot breakfast, as they would need a fully licensed kitchen to do so. Therefore, breakfast foods are typically made up of cold cereals, juice, coffee and toast, English muffin or assorted breads and muffins. Guests gather in the kitchen, dining area or designated common space for breakfast should they so choose.

Why not choose to stay at a bed and breakfast on your next vacation or holiday.